News

Ferguson indictment decision incites the people

CAMRYN LELAND

On August 9, 2014 black Michael Brown was shot and killed by white police officer Darren Wilson in Ferguson, Missouri. The details of the shooting have been disputed and conspiracies have risen, which have resulted in large protests throughout the nation.

Brown and his friend, Dorian Johnson, were walking down the street when Wilson drove to the two men and told them to move to the sidewalk. An altercation occurred that resulted in some tussling between Brown and Wilson. Wilson fired off 12 shots in Brown’s direction. Seven or eight shots actually hit Brown in the front of his body, along with a fatal shot to the top of his head.
There has been mass controversy on whether or not Brown had his hands up (to signify he was unarmed), whether Brown had charged Wilson as he fired the shots off and the most important debate, whether or not Wilson should be charged for the killing of Brown.

A grand jury composed of three blacks and whites heard the evidence of the Brown shooting and had to decide whether or not the shooting of Brown was a “criminal act or an act of self defense.” The members of the jury reviewed the case and all of it’s evidence for months and on Nov. 23, 2014 the memorandum was televised, announcing the decision. The grand jury did not indicate Wilson on any of the five possible charges the prosecutors gave.

Since Ferguson was full of rage and anger, riots sprang up there and all over the country. In the beginning some riots were peaceful and the citizens were well within their rights to continue gathering. As time went on, protesters became more aggressive resulting in many officials becoming hostile and vexed with the protesters. The use of excessive militarization came into play when riot police began shooting rubber bullets at protesters, using tear gas and arresting hundreds. This only infuriated the protesters and ultimately caused more violent outbursts that resulted in burning police cars, looting local stores and damaging city property.

Today, protests are occurring in different cities all over the nation. These men and women are protesting against systematic racism and militarization oppression and the unfortunate loss of 18-year-old Michael Brown.